Placement Guide for Those Entering Emory College


Calculus
Advanced Math for Students with 6 Hours of AP Credit
Computer Science Classes

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Advanced Math Placement Guide
Calculus Placement Guide
Computer Science Placement Guide

Calculus

Math 111: Calculus I

This course covers limits, differentiation, and the integration of single variable functions. Students will learn how to interpret and compute results in these topics, as well as to understand their application within the social and natural sciences. This is a 3 credit hour course.
Prerequisites:
None
Intended Audience:
Recommended for those with no prior Calculus experience, and for those majoring in Mathematics, Chemistry, Business, Computer Science, Physics, or Economics


Math 111L: Calculus I with Lab

This course covers the same topics as Calculus I (Math 111), but with its expanded time frame, provides more examples, application, and practice through group and individual work in the labs. There will be more frequent assessment of, and support for, progress using a web- based set of exercises and quizzes. It also uses an electronic version of the Calculus textbook (eBook) with software that provides extensive additional materials. This is a 4 credit hour course. Offered in Fall Only
Prerequisites:
None
Intended Audience:
Recommended for those with no prior Calculus experience, and for those majoring in Mathematics, Chemistry, Business, Computer Science, Physics, or Economics


Math 112: Calculus II

This course is intended for those who have completed Math 111 at Emory or who have completed Calculus l at another university. It starts with techniques on integration and introduces topics as if it is the first time students have seen them. Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer
Prerequisites:
• Math 111 or 111L at Emory, or
• Calculus I at another university.
Intended Audience:
Math 112 is the recommended route for students majoring in Math, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, or Economics.


Math 112Z: Calculus II

This course begins with series and sequences. It recaps the techniques of integration, but at a quick pace. Offered in Fall Only, Available to Freshmen only
Prerequisites:
To enter this course, you must have:
• A score of 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement exam, or
• A score of 5,6, or 7 on the HL I.B. Math test.
Intended Audience:
Math 112 is the recommended route for students majoring in Math, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, or Economics.


Math 116: Life Sciences Calculus II

This course introduces students to the application of differential equations and probability theory in the life sciences. The course begins with a quick review of some integration techniques, exponential growth, and decay. Students will be briefly introduced to the matrix and multivariable calculus topics needed to study systems of differential equations that model such phenomena as competition, predator/prey, and epidemics. There is an introduction to probability theory, followed by several applications to topics such as genetics. This is a 4 credit hour course. Offered in Fall and Spring
Prerequisites:
Freshman who have:
• Completed Math 111, or
• Received a 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement exam, or
• Scored a 5,6, or 7 on the HL I.B. Math test.
Intended Audience:
Math 116 is required for students pursuing a BS in Biology.
It is not required for the Biology BA but is often recommended for Medical Schools.
Math 116 is not designed for students pursuing higher- level math and does not satisfy the prerequisite for any advanced math courses.

If you wish to pursue 200-level math courses, you should take Math 112 or Math 112Z (for students with AP credit).


Advanced Math for Students with 6 Hours of AP Credit

Math 221: Multivariable Calculus

This course extends the ideas of differentiation and integration to functions of more than one variable, focusing on computation and integration of the results. It also defines vector-valued functions and investigates the concepts of differentiation and integration in this setting. Applications include optimization of functions of more than one variable and computing the work done by a continuous force field. Fall, Spring, and Summer
Prerequisites:
• Six hours of AP credit (a score of 4 or 5 on the AP BC exam)
or
• Math 112 or 112Z
Intended Audience:
This course is intended for students majoring in one of the following fields:
• Math
• Physics
• Economics


Math 212: Differential Equations

This course begins by defining a differential equation with the main objective of the course being to find a solution or set of solutions to a given differential equation. Several families of differential equations are examined and solutions computed when possible. Differential equations are used to model dynamic systems. There will be several applications throughout the course demonstrating how to set up and solve such systems. Fall and Spring
Prerequisites:
• Six hours of AP credit (a score of 4 or 5 on the AP BC exam)
or
• Math 112 or 112Z
Intended Audience:
Math 212 is required for students majoring in Applied Math, Applied Math & Stats, and Physics BS degrees.


Math 221: Linear Algebra

This course begins with the definition of a matrix and some fundamental operations that can be performed on matrices, such as adding or multiplying two matrices together. Vector spaces are also introduced. A connection is then formed by modeling vector spaces using matrices. Advanced topics involving matrices, such as diagonalization and quadratic forms, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, orthogonalization, and the Gram-Schmidt process are examined. Fall and Spring
Prerequisites:
• Six hours of AP BC credit, or
• Math 112 or 112Z
Intended Audience:
This course is required for students majoring in the Mathematics BA, Applied Math BS, and the Applied Math/Stats BS, as well as the Computer Science BA and BS.

Note: Other departments, such as Chemistry and Economics, highly recommend that students take one or more of the math classes described above if they plan to pursue graduate school. See your specific department’s website or advisors for more details.


Math 275: Honors Linear Algebra

Math 275 and Math 276 provide ambitious math majors with an accelerated pathway into more advanced math courses. Students who complete the full-year sequence fulfill the major requirements for Linear Algebra (Math 221), Multivariable Calculus (Math 211,) and Foundations of Math (Math 250). Math 275 and 276 are more intense than regular versions of these courses, so math majors who elect this route should be ready for a serious challenge.
Note: If you complete Math 275 without completing Math 276, you will be given credit for Math 211. You must complete the sequence in order to get credit for all 3 courses listed above.
Math 275: Fall
Math 276: Spring
Prerequisites:
• A score of 5 on the AP Calculus BC exam, or
• A score of 7 on the HL IB exam, or
• Permission of the instructor, see below:
Students, including freshmen, who wish to enroll, must email enroll275@mathcs.emory.edu. Include a screen shot showing your AP or IB text scores.
Intended Audience:
Math 275 and 276 are intended for ambitious math majors, including freshmen, who are serious about math and ready for the challenging material covered. When both courses are completed, students will have access into more advanced math courses.


Computer Science Classes

CS 153: Computing for Bioinformatics

This course covers the tools and concepts of Computer Science that are relevant to Bioinformatics with a focus on problems with genetic sequence data. Students will be programming in Python with applications to data management and web sources.
Offered in Fall
Prerequisites:
None
Intended Audience:
CS 153 can be used towards the minor in Computer Informatics.


CS 170: Introduction to Computer Science I

This class is an introduction to computer science. The programming is done in Java. Students will be given a hands-on introduction to the UNIX operating system (OS).
Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer
Prerequisites:
None
Intended Audience:
CS 170 is intended for students who plan to major or minor in any of the following:
• Major in Mathematics
• Major or minor in Computer Science
• Minor in Bioinformatics
CS 170 is also recommended for students who anticipate further coursework in CS or substantive computing in other disciplines


CS 171: Introduction to Computer Science II

This course is a continuation of CS 170 which further explores programming with Java. The emphasis is on the theory and implementation of data structures, algorithms, and object-oriented design. The problem of storing and searching for data is examined, and several approaches to this problem are evaluated for efficiency.
Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer
Prerequisites:
CS 170
Intended Audience:
CS 171 is intended for students who plan to major, minor, or pursue further coursework in Computer Science


CS 171Z: Introduction to Computer Science II

CS 171Z is a permission-only course for students with prior programming experience. Students should have substantial coding experience in Java (for example AP CS) including data types, loops, arrays, functions/methods, and classes. The course combines a quick review of CS170 with an accelerated coverage of CS171. Programming projects are typically more complex and larger in scope than CS171, and some topics not found in CS171 may also be discussed.

Students who wish to take this course must request permission by writing to cs171z@mathcs.emory.edu. You must include a screen shot of your Computer Science AP credit or your prior Java programming experience. Offered in Fall only
Prerequisites:
• Computer Science AP credit, or
• Prior Java programming experience
Intended Audience:
CS 171Z is intended for accelerated students who plan to major, minor, or pursue further coursework in Computer Science.