CS554 Database Systems

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Assignments and Projects

Assigned

Due

Assignment 1 (Written)

09/13/06

09/20/06

Assignment 1 Solution

Assignment 2 (Reading) – Any 2 paper from Readings 1-5

09/21/06

09/28/06

 

Assignment 3 (Programming)

09/29/06

10/13/06

SortMerge.java

Assignment 4 (Written)

10/17/06

10/24/06

Assignment 4 Solution

Project Proposal

 

11/9/06

 

Project Report

 

12/15/06

 

Readings

#

Paper

Topics

1

Operating Systems Support for Database Management, Michael Stonebraker, Communications of the ACM, 1981

stonebraker81operating

General, Data Storage

2

A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID), David A. Patterson, Garth A. Gibson, and Randy H. Katz, SIGMOD, 1988

patterson88case

Disk Storage

3

The R*-Tree: An Efficient and Robust Access Method for Points and Rectangles, N. Beckmann, H-P. Kriegel, R. Schneider, B. Seeger, 1990

beckmann90rtree

Multidimensional Indexing

4*

Mondrian Multidimensional K-Anonymity, K. LeFevre, D. J. DeWitt, R. Ramakrishnan, ICDE, 2006

lefevre06mondrian

Data Privacy, Multidimensional Indexing

5*

Supporting Complex Multidimensional Queries in P2P Systems, ICDCS, 2005

liu05supporting

P2P, Multidimensional Indexing

6

Access Path Selection in a Relational Database Management Systems, SIDMOD, 1979

selinger79access

Query Optimization

7

ARIES: A Transaction Recovery Method Supporting Fine-Granularity Locking and Partial Rollbacks Using Write-Ahead Logging, TODS, 1992

mohan92aries

Transaction Management

8

R* Optimizer Validation and Performance Evaluation for Distributed Queries

mackert86r

Distributed Query Processing

9

Mariposa: A Wide-Area Distributed Database System, VLDB Journal, 1996

stonebraker96mariposa

Distributed Query Processing

10*

RankSQL: Query Algebra and Optimization for Relational Top-k Queries, SIGMOD 2003

li05ranksql

Query Processing, Top-K Quries

11*

PeerDB: A P2P-Based System for Distributed Data Sharing, ICDE, 2003

ng03peerdb

P2P, Distributed Query Processing

12*

Information Sharing Across Private Databases, VLDB, 2003

agrawal03information

Distributed Query Processing, Data Privacy

13*

Two Can Keep A Secret: A Distributed Architecture for Secure Database Services, CIDR, 2005

aggarwal05two

System Architecture, Distributed Database Design and Query Processing, Data Security

14*

ULDBs: Databases with Uncertainty and Lineage, VLDB, 2006

benjelloun06uldbs

System Architecture, Query Processing, Data Uncertainty and Lineage

15*

From Databases to Dataspaces: A New Abstraction for Information Management, SIGMOD Record, 2005

franklin05from

Information Management beyond Database Systems

* can be selected for paper presentation in class

There will be reading, written and programming assignments spaced out over the first 2/3 of the semester. There will also be an in-class paper presentation scheduled in one of the presentation sessions over the last 2/3 of the semester. The last 1/3 of the semester is reserved for the final course project

Written Assignments

For each written assignment, you are expected to solve small short-answer problems. Please hand in your solution on paper or email solution to the instructor (PDF version preferred).

Reading Assignments

For each reading assignments, you are expected to read two papers from the reading list and prepare a review for each paper. The papers are drawn from both classic database literature and recent publications. Please email your review to the instructor (PDF version preferred).

Each review should be typically one page and discuss the following:

        At least three important things that the paper says (e.g. the problem, the main approaches, the key contributions);

        At least two interesting things that you found in the paper or two things you liked about the paper (e.g., a non-obvious pitfall, an uncanny insight, a neat trick that could be used elsewhere);

        At least one weakness of the paper or one thing that you did not like about the paper. This could lead to a discussion of potential things you may do better than the authors (e.g. an alternative approach, a different argument) or open research problems.

 

Refer to How to read a CS paper for a very good guideline in reading a paper and writing a review and The task of a referee for tips in reviewing a paper (more critical than general reading but nonetheless helpful).

Paper Presentation

Each student will be also expected to select a paper from the reading list (which you have typically chosen to read for one of your reading assignments) to present and lead the discussion in class. We expect to have 3 presentation sessions in the last 2/3 of the semester.

Your main task of the presentation is to educate the class (who may or may not have read the paper) and share what you have learned from the paper and generate a lively discussion about the paper. You can plan your presentation for about 30 minutes plus 5-10 minutes for questions and discussions. You can do either power point slides or a chalk-and-board presentation. Here is a possible structure of your presentation:

        The main problem the paper is addressing and the key ideas and contributions of the paper

        A brief overview of related work in the area

        The technical details including algorithms, techniques, and evaluations

        What you have learned from the paper - the interesting things and weaknesses you found in the paper, things you did or did not like about the paper, potential research in the area and open research problems.

Refer to advices on presentation for additional advices on general presentation skills and presenting a theoretical CS paper (most of the guidelines apply in general).